5 Wireless Communication Topics You Should Know This Week 3/7/14

Posted by Kendra Newlon

Friday, March 7, 2014

We thought we’d round up some of the top highlights this week in the Communication world and give them to you in one place. Check out some buzz worthy stories happening in the wireless communication and public safety world!

 

fema1) The Council On Financial Reform (COFAR) Fraud Alert: FEMA announced that there are scam artists claiming to be the Council on Financial Reform contacting individuals reporting that they’ve received grants from the government. However, the individual must pay a processing fee which can only be paid by giving up bank account information. COFAR stresses that they will never ask for such personal information when dealing with grants. Read more on this topic on the Grant Fraud website.

2) ‘Tapping’ Method: New method used by 911 call centers to help identify whether a genuine 911 call was made when there is no one on the line. Confusion (also time and money wasted) on how to respond to these types of calls can be resolved by asking the person on the other line to tap the phone multiple times if they are in danger. If no tap is heard, the responder can account the call as a misdial. Check out how one telecommunicator saved a life by using the tapping method on Public Safety Communications website.

3) Cost Cutting in Public Safety: It comes as no surprise that many departments nationwide have to re-examine budgets due to the stifling economy. How does a public safety department stay up to date with technology in order to give the community the best possible care, while working with an even tighter constricted budget than ever before?  See how one former deputy chief is responding to all of these budget cuts nationwide.

4) Facebook and Firearms: Public Safety officials are relying on the social media networking site Facebook to help crack down on illegal gun sales and purchases. The new conceal and carry legislation is prompting citizens to look to Facebook for guns; and people are selling. New rules on Facebook “will remove reported content and notify law enforcement when necessary; limit access to posts about the sale of a regulated item to people over 18; require Page owners who sell regulated items to include language around relevant laws; and provide in-app education to people who use Instagram to search for guns.” Check out more information on the public safety involvement on Facebook here.

fcc5) Pirating interfering with Public Safety: Pirating radio frequencies has moved to the world of mobile radio. These pirated stations are beginning to interfere with public safety frequencies, causing communication problems for officers and dispatchers. The Enforcement Bureau is working around the clock to send out Forfeiture Orders to stop these pirated radio frequencies. See how your state checks out in terms of pirated radio frequency cases with the FCC.  

Topics: Public Safety Communications, Next Generation Public Safety, FCC, Social Media